Pine Ridge Indian Reservation:

 With your Lakota guide, visit Pine Ridge Reservation and Wounded Knee  

Visit Pine Ridge Indian Reservation - modern day home of the Lakota Sioux, with Go Native America

Where:                      Pine Ridge Indian Reservation    

Meeting Place:        TBA  

Tribes:                        Oglala Lakota                                                    

Activity level:           Very easy  

Duration:                    9 am-4.30pm                                                    

Cost:                           $425  

Overview  

Travel to Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (WazíAháŋhaŋOyáŋke in Lakota) and hear in situ the story of the Oglala Lakota people. From rolling hills and prairie terrain to rocky outcrops, Pine Ridge was originally included within the 18 million acre territory of the Great Sioux Reservation, but in 1889, the boundaries were cut by Congress to just 2 million acres, or 3,468 square miles of land. With the Lakota’s sacred He Sapa, the Black Hills in view on the horizon from some edges of the reservation, explore with your Lakota guide who will explain tribal perspectives and Lifeways. See the beauty and artisanship of the Lakota and learn of the patterns and symbolism that define their tribal art, and begin to understand why arts have become an economic lifeline in this, one of the poorest places in the entire United States for over 40 years .

 

About Your Day  

  • In Pine Ridge town, see the original Pine Ridge Agency, the Oglala Lakota Tribal government, and the Oglala Lakota College history center.

  • Tour the Heritage Center at Red Cloud School to admire the beautiful Fine Arts and crafts, and if your dates coincide, enjoy the fabulous summer Art Show there.

  • Enjoy food from local eateries and on Pine Ridge you will have opportunity to buy art and jewelry direct from Lakota artisans.

  • Your day culminates with a visit to Wounded Knee; there can be no substitute for visiting the site yourself and hearing the truth of the event from Lakota guides who can also explain the reverberations of the massacre of 1890 into contemporary Indian life.